reply to 2 student posts

reply to 2 student posts

STUDENT 1 (Andre):

Question: What is the nature and scope of the alcohol and/or drug abuse problem in the United States today? For example, is this problem more significant today than it was in the past? What are some data you can find to support whether rates have gone down or up over time?

ANSWER: According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, millions consume far more alcohol than they should on one occasion. “In 2015, 26.9 percent of people ages 18 or older reported that they engaged in binge drinking in the past month; 7.0 percent reported that they engaged in heavy alcohol use in the past month” (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, n.d.). Males engaged in binge drinking more than women in a study conducted in 2012/2013 showing 39 percent of adult males and 27 percent of adult females reported binge drinking (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2017). Over the past decade, studies have shown that extreme binge drinking has increased, so this is a problem that is more significant today than it was in the past. Research beyond the binge drinking point in the past year was significantly higher — indicating the increase in binge drinking among adults today than a decade ago (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2017).

This is a problem that is not just an issue among adults and raises a concern for college and underage groups due to the increased risk for adverse consequences including alcohol use disorders, which among age groups 12-17 623,000 adolescents had alcohol use disorders where 298,000 were males and 325,000 were females (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, n.d.). This is a large social issue that has costly global and economic affects as well. Alcohol abuse cost the United States $249.0 billion in 2010 and three quarters of that cost was related to binge drinking.

References

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.(n.d.). Alcohol facts and statistics. Retrieve from

https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-…

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (2017). Study finds tens of millions of Americans drink alcohol at dangerously high levels. Retrieve from https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-finds-tens-millions-americans-drink-alcohol-dangerously-high-levels

STUDENT 2 (Taffiny):

Question: What is the nature and scope of the alcohol and/or drug abuse problem in the United States today? For example, is this problem more significant today than it was in the past? What are some data you can find to support whether rates have gone down or up over time?

ANSWER: According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, millions consume far more alcohol than they should on one occasion. “In 2015, 26.9 percent of people ages 18 or older reported that they engaged in binge drinking in the past month; 7.0 percent reported that they engaged in heavy alcohol use in the past month” (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, n.d.). Males engaged in binge drinking more than women in a study conducted in 2012/2013 showing 39 percent of adult males and 27 percent of adult females reported binge drinking (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2017). Over the past decade, studies have shown that extreme binge drinking has increased, so this is a problem that is more significant today than it was in the past. Research beyond the binge drinking point in the past year was significantly higher — indicating the increase in binge drinking among adults today than a decade ago (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2017).

This is a problem that is not just an issue among adults and raises a concern for college and underage groups due to the increased risk for adverse consequences including alcohol use disorders, which among age groups 12-17 623,000 adolescents had alcohol use disorders where 298,000 were males and 325,000 were females (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, n.d.). This is a large social issue that has costly global and economic affects as well. Alcohol abuse cost the United States $249.0 billion in 2010 and three quarters of that cost was related to binge drinking.

References

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.(n.d.). Alcohol facts and statistics. Retrieve from

https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-…

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. (2017). Study finds tens of millions of Americans drink alcohol at dangerously high levels. Retrieve from https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-finds-tens-millions-americans-drink-alcohol-dangerously-high-levels